The toxicity of industrial/breadwinner masculinities; when climate change denial and white supremacy meet

  • Date: –15:00
  • Location: Webinar - link published here a week in advance, at the latest
  • Lecturer: Martin Hultman, Associate Professor in Science-, Technology- and Environmental Studies, Chalmers University of Technology
  • Organiser: Centre for Gender Research
  • Contact person: Nicole Ovesen
  • Seminarium

This presentation will scrutinize a particular emblematic example of how anti-environmentalism and anti-feminism today overlap; that of Greta Thunberg.

Abstract: The nexus of right-wing conservative values, anti-environment and anti-feminism has been pointed out by environmental sociologists, masculinities scholars and ecofeminist for a long time (McCright & Dunlap, 2011; Connell, 2017; & Gaard, 2017). The latest changes in the up-front political landscape globally (Bolsonaro, Trump, Johnson) digital ‘troll’ armies, value shifts among voters as well as party politics shifting more broadly towards far-right, have made this overlap even more visible. In the last couple of years this particular nexus has been has scrutinized in a more systematic way (e.g. Krange et.al, 2019; Hultman., et al. 2019; Pule & Hultman, 2019) as well as been part of conceptually creativity and theory development proposing industrial masculinity, industrial/breadwinner masculinities and/or petromasculinity as ways of understanding how this goes together (e.g Anshelm & Hultman, 2014; Hultman, 2017; Daggett, 2018). With such analysis the toxicity of industrial/breadwinner masculinities might be understood as an expression of protecting group identity and justifying an industrial modern fossil fueled societal system that provides desired benefits for a small elite group as well as a larger ‘coal face’ strand of worker – and devastating effects for the rest of us. Drawing from results from these previous studies and the conceptualization of industrial/breadwinner masculinities this paper will scrutinize a particular emblematic example of how anti-environmentalism and anti-feminism today overlap; that of Greta Thunberg (Gelin, 2019).

The Centre for Gender Research has a recurring seminar series on Thursdays, 13.15–15.00 for all those interested in gender and gender research. The Thursday seminars touch upon several different research areas, reflecting the breath of gender research. The seminars also aim to create cross-disciplinary meetings between researchers and students. 

Open for all!